Tuesday, December 4, 2012

Family

Just up University Ave from "Rising" which I showed you on the weekend you will find 2 large bas-relief sculptures at either end of what was the Bank Of Canada building. The 20 ft tall pieces were designed by artist Cleeve Horne and installed during the building's construction in the late '50s. This one is a semi-abstract representation of a Canadian family and the pieces themselves are significant for being the first abstract public sculptures installed in Toronto. My how times have changed!

14 comments:

Kay L. Davies said...

Times certainly have changed, but I can remember when abstract public sculptures were considered oh-too-avant-garde, as if they might encourage young people to become beatniks or hippies. Then, in time, that's what happened, but would likely have happened even if all public sculptures were still generals on horseback.
K

Lowell said...

Powerful and dynamic. Love this!

Halcyon said...

I have never noticed these, but I will pay more attention the next time I'm in the area. I like the idea of an "abstract" family. The traditional "family" is maybe not the norm these days. But I sort of like it that way.

Shaun Gibbs said...

I haven't had much dealings with sculptured art. But just looking at it from the amount of workmanship and vision from the artist is amazing. Thanks for sharing.
Shaun

Sharon said...

This one is gorgeous, I love it.

Deb said...

Looks like a 50s Canadian family had aspirations! Great sculpture.

Jack said...

So, in the 1950s, Canadian families looked like they were made from Silly Putty?

Linda said...

They seem either to be escaping from something (Europe?) or striving toward something - in a very patriarchal way!

llandudnopictures said...

It certainly is one of those sculptures where the more you look the more you see!

EG CameraGirl said...

Times really have changed, haven't they? I like 'Rising' very much.

Gerald (Hyde DP) said...

I like this a lot.

ArtandArchitecture-SF.com said...

This is just gorgeous, I am sorry this art form has really died out because it adds so much to a giant stone wall.

NixBlog said...

We have similar style relief sculptures on the walls of Wilson Hall at University of Melbourne. They do look a little dated and awkward though...

William Kendall said...

I've no doubt seen these, walking through the area. I'll have to get another look next time I'm there.