Saturday, January 30, 2016

Modern Addition

This is another pic taken in the fall and it shows one of the wonderful Gothic Revival cottages that were extremely popular in Ontario before 1950. This one has had a modern addition put onto the back but the addition fits very well and doesn't overpower the original cottage at all.

21 comments:

VP said...

These cottages are lovely!

EG CameraGirl said...

The addition is fabulous for letting light into these homes that otherwise can be quite dark inside. I agree that it doesn't overpower the original cottage.

William Kendall said...

Quite a contrast in the addition.

Sharon Anck said...

they did a good job blending it well and yet preserving the original cottage.

Karl Demetz said...

A really nice cottage !

Cloudia said...

cool!

Lowell said...

That's incredible. I'm sure the addition gives some much-needed space, too.

jennyfreckles said...

That's a very pleasing combination of old and new.

LOLfromPasa said...

I like it. Blends in nicely.

Andy said...

Pretty nice looking home.

Revrunner said...

Wow! What a combination.

Stephanie said...

The two work very well together.

cieldequimper said...

Hmmmm... Love the cottage but not so much the addition. To each his own...

Karen S. said...

I really like it! Very pretty, nicely added addition and the landscape is nice too!

Taken For Granted said...

This is an architectural mixture of styles that would never occur to me, but I'm such a conservative when it comes to architecture. Somehow the mixture is not offensive as I assume it would be. Great subject for your photo.

orvokki said...

Lovely-looking house.

Luis Gomez said...

Love how it looks!

genie said...

This could be y dream home. It is precious and so pretty. Beautiful architecture. I can tell there is a lot of light in the home.

Tom said...

looks good I must say

Jackie Mc Guinness said...

Agree, it works very well.

Jack said...

I agree with you. It is quite nice. When I worked in Ohio, I lived in a historic district. Most of the buildings were brick, and additions were required to be in contrasting materials, usually wood and glass, so there was no confusion about what was original and what was an addition. That is what they did here.