Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Worm Factory Conversion


I love to find interesting conversions of buildings and this one is found in the West Queen St West neighbourhood. The home was a former worm factory! (Who knew there was such a thing!) The architects were Stephanie Mills and Jonathan Crinion and of course I love the Corten steel especially with the cedar wood. I think it goes back quite a distance but is totally landlocked into the backyards of the surrounding homes so it was impossible to see.

20 comments:

Andy said...

A worm factory. Very interesting.

EG Wow said...

I guess it was a factory for making worm castings, which is said to be excellent garden fertilizer. I don't know that as a fact, though.

NixBlog said...

Very modern design, but seems to be an integral part of the landscape. I love natural materials being used in buildings.
Yes, worms and castings are excellent for the garden!

Halcyon said...

I've never heard of a worm factory either, but I like this house!

David Thomas said...

Always wished I had studied architecture. A great way to make a living if you are good.

La Principessa Errante said...

What an intriguing reuse project, love the corten as well

Paul in Powell River said...

Worm factory?? - now that would be a great topic of conversation as you sit in the living room!

LĂșcia said...

Worm factory, that's very unexpected! ;-)

Regina K said...

I'm not sure I could live in a converted worm factory. I think I would always feel them crawling on me : )

Kay L. Davies said...

Yes, a little creepy, but an interesting topic of conversation as Paul said!
K

Jack said...

Not for me. I would wake up screaming, imagining that they left a few behind.

Lowell said...

Fascinating. Funny they didn't use wormwood in place of cedar. But I think wormwood has holes in it. Or is that Swiss cheese?

Whatever, as interesting as this place appears to be, I'll pass. I'm thinking of buying an $18,000 golf cart, and a small trailer and live in the trailer. On a golf course. But not in Canada. Too cold.

Re your comment on Cedar Key: It doth get cold sometimes - I mean it gets nasty - all the way down into the 50s and 60s and if'n you're on the water you can really get a chill.

Actually, it wasn't that cold that day. But as I said, on the water makes a difference. They're probably Floridians with thin blood. If they were from Ontario they'd be in their shorts and T-shirts.

llandudnopictures said...

An interesting looking building with a very interesting past!

PerthDailyPhoto said...

Now that is a very unique concept Red, I haven't heard of a worm factory but definitely a worm farm, same thing I guess, but you wouldn't think in a suburban neighborhood hey!

Sharon said...

Very interesting look.

Gringo said...

Worm factory? !! I must agree with Jack, I think I would wake up feeling the worms crawling over me!

JM said...

I googled worm factory just to be sure I was getting it right! :-) I like the house, it's very cool.

Lesley said...

It does look like they value their privacy, with the windows and the gates!

Sallie (FullTime-Life.com said...

What an odd thing! I've seen houses from converted barns, and converted school houses, and lofts in converted factories, but this is one I never in my life would have imagined. I'd love to meet the people who lived there and get a tour of the inside wouldn't you?

Kitty said...

fun!
I like the corten, too. The whole building was designed to weather, which is nice. I have to wonder tho if there are enough windows. Maybe there are more windows on the back?