Monday, September 18, 2017

Three Sisters Mural

I showed you a mural a couple of weeks ago done by the Chilean artists Tikay & Aner and they also did this one at the same time just down the block on Dundas St W. It is titled Three Sisters which refers to the crops maize, climbing beans, and squash, a name given by various First Nations groups to these foods that were a major source of nutrition for them. In the mural you can see one of the three crops beside each of the three women. 
Taking part in Monday Murals. Click HERE to see more murals from around the world.

17 comments:

Lea said...

That is a wonderful mural! I love it!
Have a great week!

Lowell said...

This is terrific! I love how the faces are so different yet so much alike. And I've learned something new about the First Nations groups!

Tom said...

...oh I like this one!

Adam said...

a very good mural

PerthDailyPhoto said...

I like it so much Pat.. a mural with significance!
P.s. can you believe I finally found a copy of A Moveable Feast today in a bookshop called Boffins in the city, I should have tried there first 😊 Looking forward to reading it very much!

s.c said...

Great to know. Also learned the meaning of First Nations groups. Very nice.

Sharon said...

This is really beautiful. I didn't know that those three crops were called three sisters.

Lois said...

It is such a lovely mural with so much meaning. I like the proud looks on their faces.

William Kendall said...

That's beautifully done.

Christine said...

What a fantastic mural!

Mark said...

Ah, THOSE three sisters.

bill burke said...

The mural is beautiful and well done. I like the meaning behind it, very nice Pat.

Cloudia said...

Very informative and beautiful Pat

Catalyst said...

How curious. I was just watching a tv program yesterday that was showing scenes in Zion National Park in Utah and one of them was of three monoliths that I identified as Three Sisters. And today I read your blog post.

Anne Hagman-Niilola said...

Oh! So lovely!

21 Wits said...

Such life and color, it's beautiful!

Oakland Daily Photo said...

Wonderful image. Crops are still grown this way in rural Mexico along with agave for mescal production. I recently read that when Europeans first came to the East Coast they did not recognize the First People's landscape as cultivated crops due to their own world view that agriculture was defined by large field with furrowed rows. Now we call this method "complementary plantings." Fascinating, no? Thanks for contributing to this week's Monday Mural.